The New York Times is the largest consumer news brand in the world. The Times has audacious subscription goals and more accolades than our top competitors combined. Our growth is aggressive and our mission remains steadfast: We seek the truth and help people understand the world. Our success is attributed to more than just excellent journalism — we’ve innovated upon data insights, redesigned our storytelling and ad formats, and have attracted a premium subscription audience. We bring this talent and insight to advertisers, and look forward to being an important part of your advertising program.

Advertisements must be paid for prior to publication deadline unless credit has been established by the advertiser and/or agency with The Times. However, certain advertising categories will require prepayment as specified in the rate cards. Acceptable forms of prepayment are bank wire transfer, credit card or advertiser/agency guaranteed check.

Advertisers or agencies wishing to establish credit with The Times must request a credit application from The New York Times Credit Department. Application requests can be made by:

Completed applications should be returned to The New York Times Credit Department for evaluation of credit standing. If credit is granted, The Times will establish a credit limit and applicable payment terms. Advertisers and agencies granted credit will be billed weekly or monthly for published advertisements, as is determined by the category of advertising and established credit terms. Payment is due 15 days after the invoice date.

The advertiser and agency shall be jointly and severally liable to The Times for the payment. Cash discounts are not available.

Insertion orders containing disclaimers will not be accepted by The Times.

The New York Times maintains an Advertising Acceptability Department whose function is to examine advertisements before publication to determine if they meet the standards of acceptability The Times has developed over the years.

The Times may decline to accept advertising that is misleading, inaccurate or fraudulent; that makes unfair competitive claims; or that fails to comply with its standards of decency and dignity.

If an advertisement contains statements or illustrations that are not deemed acceptable, and that The Times thinks should be changed or eliminated, the advertiser will be notified. The Times will attempt to negotiate changes with the advertiser; however, if changes cannot be negotiated, the advertisement will be declined by The Times.

All 3rd party tags (creative serving and tracking-only) and accompanying technologies being served by the tags must be SSL Compliant (https). In addition, an advertisement must sometimes be declined because of the applicability of laws dealing with such matters as libel, copyright and trademark, the right to privacy, the sale of securities, political advertising and products that are prohibited by federal or state laws.

The New York Times maintains clear separation between news and editorial matter and its advertisements. Accordingly, ads that include elements usually associated with The New York Times editorial matter will not be accepted. (For example, but not limited to: Times-style headlines, bylines, news-style column arrangements or typography.) Additionally, The Times reserves the right to label an advertisement with the word “advertisement” when, in its opinion, this is necessary to make clear the distinction between editorial material and advertising.

If you have any questions regarding creative guidelines, please email advertisingacceptability@nytimes.com.

The New York Times maintains an Advertising Acceptability Department whose function is to examine advertisements before publication to determine if they meet the standards of acceptability The Times has developed over the years.

The Times may decline to accept advertising that is misleading, inaccurate or fraudulent; that makes unfair competitive claims; or that fails to comply with its standards of decency and dignity.

If an advertisement contains statements or illustrations that are not deemed acceptable, and that The Times thinks should be changed or eliminated, the advertiser will be notified. The Times will attempt to negotiate changes with the advertiser; however, if changes cannot be negotiated, the advertisement will be declined by The Times.

All 3rd party tags (creative serving and tracking-only) and accompanying technologies being served by the tags must be SSL Compliant (https). In addition, an advertisement must sometimes be declined because of the applicability of laws dealing with such matters as libel, copyright and trademark, the right to privacy, the sale of securities, political advertising and products that are prohibited by federal or state laws.

The New York Times maintains clear separation between news and editorial matter and its advertisements. Accordingly, ads that include elements usually associated with The New York Times editorial matter will not be accepted. (For example, but not limited to: Times-style headlines, bylines, news-style column arrangements or typography.) Additionally, The Times reserves the right to label an advertisement with the word “advertisement” when, in its opinion, this is necessary to make clear the distinction between editorial material and advertising.

If you have any questions regarding creative guidelines, please email advertisingacceptability@nytimes.com.

The New York Times maintains an Advertising Acceptability Department whose function is to examine advertisements before publication to determine if they meet the standards of acceptability The Times has developed over the years.

The Times may decline to accept advertising that is misleading, inaccurate or fraudulent; that makes unfair competitive claims; or that fails to comply with its standards of decency and dignity.

If an advertisement contains statements or illustrations that are not deemed acceptable, and that The Times thinks should be changed or eliminated, the advertiser will be notified. The Times will attempt to negotiate changes with the advertiser; however, if changes cannot be negotiated, the advertisement will be declined by The Times.

All 3rd party tags (creative serving and tracking-only) and accompanying technologies being served by the tags must be SSL Compliant (https). In addition, an advertisement must sometimes be declined because of the applicability of laws dealing with such matters as libel, copyright and trademark, the right to privacy, the sale of securities, political advertising and products that are prohibited by federal or state laws.

The New York Times maintains clear separation between news and editorial matter and its advertisements. Accordingly, ads that include elements usually associated with The New York Times editorial matter will not be accepted. (For example, but not limited to: Times-style headlines, bylines, news-style column arrangements or typography.) Additionally, The Times reserves the right to label an advertisement with the word “advertisement” when, in its opinion, this is necessary to make clear the distinction between editorial material and advertising.

If you have any questions regarding creative guidelines, please email advertisingacceptability@nytimes.com.

The New York Times maintains an Advertising Acceptability Department whose function is to examine advertisements before publication to determine if they meet the standards of acceptability The Times has developed over the years.

The Times may decline to accept advertising that is misleading, inaccurate or fraudulent; that makes unfair competitive claims; or that fails to comply with its standards of decency and dignity.

If an advertisement contains statements or illustrations that are not deemed acceptable, and that The Times thinks should be changed or eliminated, the advertiser will be notified. The Times will attempt to negotiate changes with the advertiser; however, if changes cannot be negotiated, the advertisement will be declined by The Times.

All 3rd party tags (creative serving and tracking-only) and accompanying technologies being served by the tags must be SSL Compliant (https). In addition, an advertisement must sometimes be declined because of the applicability of laws dealing with such matters as libel, copyright and trademark, the right to privacy, the sale of securities, political advertising and products that are prohibited by federal or state laws.

The New York Times maintains clear separation between news and editorial matter and its advertisements. Accordingly, ads that include elements usually associated with The New York Times editorial matter will not be accepted. (For example, but not limited to: Times-style headlines, bylines, news-style column arrangements or typography.) Additionally, The Times reserves the right to label an advertisement with the word “advertisement” when, in its opinion, this is necessary to make clear the distinction between editorial material and advertising.

If you have any questions regarding creative guidelines, please email advertisingacceptability@nytimes.com.

The New York Times maintains an Advertising Acceptability Department whose function is to examine advertisements before publication to determine if they meet the standards of acceptability The Times has developed over the years.

The Times may decline to accept advertising that is misleading, inaccurate or fraudulent; that makes unfair competitive claims; or that fails to comply with its standards of decency and dignity.

If an advertisement contains statements or illustrations that are not deemed acceptable, and that The Times thinks should be changed or eliminated, the advertiser will be notified. The Times will attempt to negotiate changes with the advertiser; however, if changes cannot be negotiated, the advertisement will be declined by The Times.

All 3rd party tags (creative serving and tracking-only) and accompanying technologies being served by the tags must be SSL Compliant (https). In addition, an advertisement must sometimes be declined because of the applicability of laws dealing with such matters as libel, copyright and trademark, the right to privacy, the sale of securities, political advertising and products that are prohibited by federal or state laws.

The New York Times maintains clear separation between news and editorial matter and its advertisements. Accordingly, ads that include elements usually associated with The New York Times editorial matter will not be accepted. (For example, but not limited to: Times-style headlines, bylines, news-style column arrangements or typography.) Additionally, The Times reserves the right to label an advertisement with the word “advertisement” when, in its opinion, this is necessary to make clear the distinction between editorial material and advertising.

If you have any questions regarding creative guidelines, please email advertisingacceptability@nytimes.com.

The New York Times maintains an Advertising Acceptability Department whose function is to examine advertisements before publication to determine if they meet the standards of acceptability The Times has developed over the years.

The Times may decline to accept advertising that is misleading, inaccurate or fraudulent; that makes unfair competitive claims; or that fails to comply with its standards of decency and dignity.

If an advertisement contains statements or illustrations that are not deemed acceptable, and that The Times thinks should be changed or eliminated, the advertiser will be notified. The Times will attempt to negotiate changes with the advertiser; however, if changes cannot be negotiated, the advertisement will be declined by The Times.

All 3rd party tags (creative serving and tracking-only) and accompanying technologies being served by the tags must be SSL Compliant (https). In addition, an advertisement must sometimes be declined because of the applicability of laws dealing with such matters as libel, copyright and trademark, the right to privacy, the sale of securities, political advertising and products that are prohibited by federal or state laws.

The New York Times maintains clear separation between news and editorial matter and its advertisements. Accordingly, ads that include elements usually associated with The New York Times editorial matter will not be accepted. (For example, but not limited to: Times-style headlines, bylines, news-style column arrangements or typography.) Additionally, The Times reserves the right to label an advertisement with the word “advertisement” when, in its opinion, this is necessary to make clear the distinction between editorial material and advertising.

If you have any questions regarding creative guidelines, please email advertisingacceptability@nytimes.com.